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JANUARY 1919
The Call of January 10, 1919

SCHOOL BOARD PROCEEDINGS
The school board met in monthly session Monday evening and transacted the usual routine business.  The
greater portion of the session was occupied in hearing a number of parents summoned to appear to show the
board cause why their children should be excused from nonattendance at school.  In all cases listed,
excepting one, the causes as explained proved satisfactory and the children excused.  One father, Robert
Donton of Liberty Street, who did not appear before the board will be prosecuted for violation of the
compulsory school law.  Truant officer Butz was given instructions to proceed immediately in this manner.
In reference to the inability to heat several rooms in the high school building, no definite action was taken as
the new janitor who has been asking to begin work at once will be given a chance to try to heat up the rooms
in question.  If the new janitor fails, a special meeting of the board is to be held and the question of then
making some definite arrangements in reference to the heating plant will be taken.  

BRAINS AND WISDOM OF A WISE GUY NEEDED
When the wire on the flagpole at the town hall broke several weeks ago it opened up a controversy and
caused a condition which promises to require the brains of more than one person before it is righted again.  
The entire proposition seems simple enough, yet no one thus far has been able to determine just how to go
about solving it.  All that is desired is to have  another new rope or wire run through the ring at the top of this
fifty five foot pole.  Anyone having suggestions as to how to accomplish this task will please convey the same
to either the street commissioner or members of the building committee.  

MORE HELMETS RECEIVED
This week, Mrs. Lewis Bolton of Liberty Street received two German helmets, one from Daniel Bolton and one
from Emmanuel Knarr, both of whom participated in the heavy fighting in France.  Most every day souvenirs in
large quantities are received by local persons from the town soldier boys "over there."


The Call of January 17, 1919

TO BUILD ADDITION TO GARAGE
Work was this week begun by the contractor on enlarging the Ebling Garage in Spring Garden.  A frame
addition of sixty by thirty feet will be built on the north side of the present building and when completed will
give this garage an unusually large amount of floor space.

INFLUENZA AMONG THE FARMERS
Influenza and the grippe are raging among the rural districts in the vicinity of Schuylkill Haven, in the
Roedersville, Rock and Summit Station districts.  Many cases are reported and it is said that in some sections
by reason of every member in the family being ill, neighboring farmers are required to care for and feed the
stock.  The Schuylkill haven physicians in addition to answering the numerous local sick calls are also called
upon to visit the sick in the sections above named.  One local physician recently left for the country district at
seven in the morning and did not return until eight in the evening having been kept busy ministering to the
sick during the entire period.

MAY BE SOME CHANGES IN LOCAL SALOONS
indications are that there may be changes in three local saloons within the next month or two so far as the
proprietors are concerned.  While all present local saloon men have made application for a renewal of their
licenses it is understood that at least two of them have already made arrangements to enter into some other
occupations very shortly.  Licenses have been asked for upon the suggestion of the owners of the properties
as it will be easier to have a license transferred then to procure a new license were the license for the old
stand to be forfeited by not having it renewed.  The other saloon man it is understood is not so certain as to
just what he will do in the matter as he does not feel like paying $225, the complete cost for a license for a
year, and not know how ling the government will permit booze to be sold.

IN MIDST OF ANNIVERSARY SALE
Harry Cooper, ladies' and gent's outfitter, in celebration of his fourth year of business operations in Schuylkill
Haven, is conducting a mammoth anniversary sale in conjunction with the January unloading sale.  The event
began last Saturday and will continue until February 1.  At this sale, all goods are being offered at greatly
reduced prices and this fact has during the week attracted large numbers of buyers from this entire section.  
Wonderful values at less than factory prices are offered in both the ladies' and gent's wearing apparel and
judging from present attendance at the sale, it will be a huge success.


The Call of January 24, 1919

NOT KILLED IN FRANCE
Albert Coller, who several months ago had been reported by the War Department as having been killed in
France, is still alive according to a recent telegram received.  Evidently he had been ill or wounded as the
same states he is improving and will be sent to the States as soon as his health permits.

COMPANY C NOW IN LUXEMBOURG
From information received it is learned that Company C of the 103rd Engineers, have been in Luxembourg for
the past week or more.  The entire 28th Division, being part of the army of occupation, is in this section of the
country.  It is also learned that Company C boys were without rifles and packs and only had with them the
clothing that they were wearing.

MISSION BAND ENTERTAINED
The Mission Band of the Grace Evangelical Church was entertained at the vacant parsonage property on
Union Street on Saturday afternoon.  Following the entertainment, the teachers, Miss Lillie Klotz and Miss
Anna Bitzer, chaperoned the children to Scott's ice cream parlor where they were treated to pretzels and ice
cream.


The Call of January 31, 1919

CARL FEY IN SCOTLAND
Letters of Carl Fey, of canal Street, who was sometime ago released from the German prison camp, writes from
a hospital in Scotland that he is rapidly regaining his health.  From his letters it is gathered that the wound in
his jaw is not quite healed, that he had also been wounded in the arm and is suffering a nervous breakdown.  
He writes that he does not expect to sail for home until some time in April.

ROLLING MILL RESUMES
After a temporary shutdown for a week or two, the Schuylkill Haven rolling mill resumed operations on Tuesday
morning of this week.  Quite a number of men have been given employment and it is understood sufficient
orders are on hand to keep the plant in operation for quite some time.

TOWN IS FREE OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASE
The Schuylkill Haven Board of Health held a regular monthly meeting on Monday evening of this week.  Little
business was transacted outside of the reorganization.  The report of Health Officer Butz showed the town
was entirely free of contagious disease.  No complaints of nuisance were reported.  The reorganization was
effected by the election of Dr. L. D. Heim, president; I. W. Tyson, secretary and John Butz, health officer.  The
salaries of the secretary and health officer were increased from $100 to $125 per year.

MAKE IT "WELCOME HOME"
The suggestion has been made and we think it worthy of passing it along.  It is to the effect that the Victory
Arch on Main Street be temporarily changed so as to extend to the soldier boys who are returning home
mustered out, one by one, some sort of a welcome home.  As there still remains several months before this
arch will be used for the Liberty Loan campaign it could without any great expense be changed by having new
muslin placed thereon with some sentence or word of "Welcome Home" to our boys.  How about it?

BAND CONCERT PLEASED LARGE AUDIENCE
The concert given by the Citizen's Band in the Euclid Theatre on Saturday evening drew an unusually large
audience, the theatre being taxed to its capacity and many persons being turned away because seats were not
obtainable.  A neat sum of money was realized.  The band proposes to continue these concerts on Saturday
evenings, at least one a month, during the remainder of the winter season.

LANDMARK CHOPPED DOWN
There was recently removed from its position on saint Charles Street, one of the old and historic landmarks of
the town, namely the willow tree which is said to have been some fifty to sixty years of age and was the largest
and probably the oldest willow tree in the town.  Under its shade, many persons found comfort in summer time
and prior to the flood which marred that section of the town, added much to the beauty of that section.

SHOOTING ELECTRIC GLOBES
Constable Butz this week caught a number of youngsters from Spring Garden shooting at electric globes of
the street lighting system.  Unless the parents pay for the globes, suit will be entered against them by the
electric light department of the borough.
ADS FROM THE CALL
NEWSPAPER IN JANUARY 1919